By Amber Kingsley, Sheltie Nation Contributing Writer

obese SheltieAs pet owners, we always want what’s best for our four-legged friends, but sometimes being too generous with food and treats is literally killing our canines with this type of excessive kindness. In a recent post, we highlighted the story of a six-year old Sheltie named Shannon who was well-loved, but overly fed by her elderly owners to the point of being extremely obese.

Shannon’s overweight condition was so dire upon her surrender that she suffered from paralysis in her hind legs, later blood work revealed a thyroid condition, she had open sores and a skin condition on her under carriage from a buildup of feces and urine that was only revealed after a much-needed haircut.

Thankfully, through loving foster care and generous donations to the GSSR (Granite State Sheltie Rescue) where she was surrendered, this little darling has been slowly losing weight, moving around a little more freely and seems to have a much happier outlook towards a longer, healthier lifestyle. Although Shannon still has a long road ahead of her towards a complete recovery, things are looking much brighter for this wonderful dog.

A Sizeable And Ironic Education

One might think for smaller dogs, like a Sheltie, they wouldn’t need as much activity and exercise compared to a much larger dog. But here’s where some dog owners are sorely mistaken, quite literally as a matter of fact.

Technically this particular canine breed known as a Shetland Sheepdog, is categorized and considered as a working class animal. They have been specifically bred over many years to actively control flocks of sheep and herds of cattle. They instinctively need plenty of exercise along with a healthy diet.

Don’t Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

Another common misconception, as highlighted previously, is that bigger dogs will need more exercise compared to smaller canines, but sometimes this isn’t the case. According to Sleep.org, a typical “dog day” consists of about 50% of sleeping, 30% of their time simply spent lying around while awake and 20% being active.

While these statistics point to about four hours of a typical dog’s day spent being active when they’re awake, many pet owners don’t ensure this type of exercise actually takes place. Along with a proper diet, some of these canines need to be prodded into producing more activity in their daily lives in order to stay healthy.

An Activity DefinitionSheltie on A-frame

Specific dog activities such as agility training are great ways to keep your Sheltie in great shape. However, going on daily walks, taking trips to the dog park and simply playing with our dogs will provide some of the exercise that’s necessary on a regular level in order to keep them happy and healthy. Along with a properly balanced diet, cutting down on treats and snacks, just like human children, our fur babies will thrive given this type of balance and regular routine.

As always, please check with your veterinarian when it comes to your dog’s daily diet and exercise regiment. There are many factors to consider along with a canine’s breed, their age, current body weight and other items should be carefully weighed (pardon the pun) when making these important lifestyle choices for our beloved pets.

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It is summertime here in the USA, when the living is easy — unless you have a dog who spends lots of time in the outdoors. Spring and summer are the most active and prolific seasons for ticks, especially this summer. Ticks are going to be a big problem this year because of the relatively mild winter we’ve had across the United States. That type of weather pattern is particularly conducive to seeing lots of them. Read on for information on how to remove a tick from a dog.

Ticks are dangerous because they can transmit much more than Lyme disease. In fact, some species can emit as many as four or five different pathogens – infecting humans and dogs. If a large number of ticks infest a dog, they can suck so much blood that your pet can become anemic — a good reason to nip the prospect of ticks in the bud.

Fortunately, there’s preventive medicine that can protect your pet from picking them up in the first place, as well as foolproof techniques to remove them. But there are also popular myths out there that won’t actually fix the problem.

Common Tick Removal Myths

Petroleum jelly, burning them off, freezing them off, nail polish. These are just a few of the common folk remedies that pop up when you google tick removal. All of them won’t work — and have the potential to further hurt your pet.

Ticks do not back out once attached. Their head remains embedded in the animal’s skin. And this is precisely the problem with petroleum jelly and nail polish: Pet owners think that they can drown or kill the tick, but the head stays in place.

Then there’s the burning method. Fact: Lighting a match anywhere near your pet is the very definition of playing with fire. This should be common sense. Your dog has hair and that hair could be singed or catch on fire.

Some owners try to freezing ticks, which they do by using an aerosol-based liquid freezing gel. We recommend you not toy with this method. You’re not a veterinary professional, so you won’t know how long to hold it on. You could injure your dog.

The other myth often heard: Once you successfully take a tick off, you can burn it. The tick is actually toxic. When it pops, it can let off a toxic fume that can be harmful to pets and infants.

Correct Tick Removal

There are a number of tick-removal tools on the market all over the world. All claim to be safe and efficient but this may not always be the case. The most important aspects of tick removal are:

  • The mouth parts of the tick should be cleanly removed along with the rest of its body.
  • The body of the tick must not be compressed.
  • The tick should not be stressed or injured, because this can cause it to regurgitate its blood meal along with any infective organisms.
  • The tick should be removed without causing the host any discomfort.

The Best Way to Remove a Tick

There is a better way than pulling them out using tweezers.

Tick removal toolThe latter is a tool that’s specially designed for safely and quickly removing ticks. There are a couple of types to choose from. One functions as blunt-ended, plastic tweezers called a Tick Twister or a Tick Stick. The other is called the Tick Key, a little gizmo that resembles a bottle opener. The hole in it comes down to a very thin point, so you can kind of slip the tick into this hole, slide the tick down to the end and basically lift — just like you would remove a cap off a bottle — and it pulls the tick out.

Your technique is equally important: Start by parting your dog’s fur where you see a tick, and then “pull it out by the body, so as not to twist or pinch the head off.

Once you’ve removed a tick, there are a couple of ways to banish it for good. If you just have a tick or two, you can put them on a piece of tape, so they can’t move, and flush them down the toilet.

Be warned: Flushing alone may not do the trick. You don’t want to flush a live tick down the toilet because they can crawl back up.  Not to mention that tape isn’t septic system friendly.

Putting them in rubbing alcohol however, will kill them. We suggest pouring a little alcohol into a bottle, dropping in the tick and then waiting five minutes until you’re sure that the tick has met its match.

Why is it safe to twist with this tool?

When using tweezers/forceps, the tick is grabbed close to the skin. Twisting the tick then exerts pressure to its mouth parts, which can cause them to break off. The Tick Twister cradles the body of the tick and doesn’t exert pressure to either its mouth parts or its abdomen. It can therefore be safely twisted, which allows the barbs on the tick’s proboscis to be freed from the surrounding tissue. Because the tool doesn’t cause any compression to the body of the tick, it minimizes the risk of disease transmission.

The Tick Twister is suitable for the removal of ticks from both humans and animals and can be disinfected with normal disinfectants or sterilized in an autoclave at 284°F (140°C). The product is made from recyclable plastic, which can also be incinerated without pollution (no chlorine fumes during combustion).

Protect Your Pet Before You Have a Tick Problem

The best way to protect your pet from ticks is to apply a monthly flea and tick preventative.

However not all tick preventers are created equal. Flea and tick collars are not as affective because they’re localized around the neck. Since fleas and ticks tend to latch on near the neck, the rump and in the crooks of a dog’s legs, most collars won’t provide complete coverage.

So how do you know if your pet requires professional care?  If you notice a large red ring developing — regardless of whether there are 1 or 100 ticks — that’s evidence of the migration of pathogens, and a good sign that veterinary treatment will be effective.

The second red flag is the actual tick count: A lone tick isn’t reason enough for a visit. However any dog who has a lot of ticks needs to seek prompt professional attention.

Bottom line: Seek out preventive care, and give your dog (along with yourself and any kids in your home) a thorough going-over on a daily basis to help ensure a carefree — and tick-free — summer.

Hot cars are deadly for dogs, even with the windows rolled down.

It is that time of the year again.  Summer is no time to take our dogs along as we run our errands.  With this record heat, it becomes even more dangerous even faster.

As we go about our busy lives please keep a look out for dogs left in cars by owners who do not know just how quickly a car can become a death trap. Reporting a dog in distress to the police can save the animal’s life.

  (At 107 degrees, dogs begin to suffer brain damage.)

Signs of Heatstroke

  • Panting
  • Staring
  • Anxious expression
  • Refusal to obey commands
  • Warm, dry skin
  • High fever
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Vomiting
  • Collapse

Cracking the Windows Doesn’t Cut it.

A study from Stanford University shows that even on comparatively cool days, such as 72 degrees, a car’s internal temperature will rocket to 116 degrees within 60 minutes. And keeping the windows open a  crack hardly slows the rise at all.

If your pet can’t come with you when you get out of the car, leave him at home. Why people don’t remember this completely annoys us here at Sheltie Nation. We rank this right up there with leaving children in cars. This is really a common sense “no no”.

Help Spread the Word

The Animal Protection Institute (API) has a website, www.MyDogisCool.com which is packed with life saving tips and resources such as windshield fliers, millions of which have been distributed since the start of the campaign. The national outreach effort also includes materials and warning notices for stores and public places.

FlyerthmbYou can also purchase the API fliers (25 for $3.00) to leave in your own glove box in case you come across a dog you suspect may be in need of help. You might just educate a complete idiot & save a precious dogie life. But if you see a dog in distress, do not hesitate to call the authorities!

A Dog-Owner’s Story of Loss and Raising Awareness

This article has been reprinted with permission by Ashley Sassaman

One of our beloved dogs, Jack, a 6-year-old, chow-lab mix, died yesterday. His death was very unexpected and traumatic. Although, our dogs did not receive the same amount of attention as they did before Bobby was born, they were still loved dearly. Bob walked them religiously every single day. Jack loved, loved, loved, playing fetch. Tennis balls were his favorite. When we discovered that he had died, we began questioning what happened to our sweet Jack.

On Monday, May 7, we took both of our dogs to our vet for their annual check ups. It was a very routine visit. They were both checked for heartworms and parasites, weighed, and listened to. They were deemed normal and healthy. They both received their rabies vaccinations, and a new drug (via injection) that was recommend by our vet, ProHeart 6. Our vet simply said, “Hey, we have this new shot that we can give them for heartworm protection instead of an oral preventative. It’s easy because it’s only one dose every 6 months.” Sounded good to us, so we agreed. That was it. That was all the information we received, and—by our own fault—all we asked for.

Both of the dogs seemed fine the first week home, then Jack started acting differently. He didn’t want to go on his daily walks. He didn’t want to fetch his tennis ball. He didn’t want to eat his dog food. My husband even tried giving him some leftover steak from our dinner, and Jack wouldn’t eat it. We knew something was up, so we took him back to the vet on Monday, May 21.

The vet discovered that Jack had a fever, but could find nothing else wrong with him. He was given a steroid shot and some antibiotics in case he had an infection, and we were sent home. Over the next few days, Jack seemed to feel better. He was still a little lethargic, but was eating and perked up when we threw a ball or petted him. He seemed on the mend. We thought he must have just had a virus and was getting better. It did not even cross our minds that he was so gravely ill, so we continued with our Memorial Day plans to go to the beach.

We returned from the beach to a grim discovery—Jack dead in a pool of blood and vomit. His poor little body was crumpled up in a strange way, like he had literally just fallen over dead. We took him to an animal ER where they confirmed that he was dead, and we paid to have his body cremated. The vet at the animal ER stated that it appeared to be a heart attack or cardiopulmonary problem that killed him.

That evening, as we wrestled with grief and trying to explain death to our 3-year-old son, we began to question what on earth had happened to our previously perky puppy. Okay—he wasn’t a puppy, but he always behaved like a frisky, fun puppy, and he certainly wasn’t an old dog. We considered the possibility that he ate something bad, but his vet had all but ruled out a GI problem. We went over and over what was different, the only thing we had changed was their heartworm medicine.

We googled the shot he had received a few weeks earlier, ProHeart 6. The drug was originally made by a division of Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, but the drug company Pfizer acquired Wyeth and all of its holdings in 2009. Pfizer’s own website lists side effects of the drug as lethargy, loss of appetite, vomiting, and death. (Source: Pfizer) Jack had exhibited exactly all of those symptoms… in that order.

After doing further research, we also discovered that the drug was originally pulled off the market in 2004 for a high rate of adverse reactions to the drug. “According to an informed veterinarian, ‘Proheart caused more deaths in one year than all of the oral heartworm preventives combined did in ten years. When the FDA notified Pfizer that their drug was causing a problem, the manufacturer claimed it was due to the vaccines’ being given at the same time. The FDA looked at the data again and told them the dogs involved had been getting their vaccinations all along and the only difference was the Proheart. That’s when the FDA informed the company of their intent to pull it and the company then voluntarily took it off the market.” (Source: The Senior Dogs Project)

Pfizer was allowed to re-market the drug in 2008 with the following stipulations: Pfizer agreed to add additional warning labels to the drug packaging, and agreed to mandate that pet owners be given a drug fact sheet and be made to sign an “informed consent” document. Pfizer went even further as to mandate web-based training for veterinarians who gave the drug, and issued several “Dear Doctor” letters to all veterinarians regarding the adverse effects of the drug. (Read one of the “Dear Doctor” letters here.)

The part that bothered and alarmed us the most was this line from the drug’s website: “ProHeart 6 dog owners must be advised of the risks of ProHeart 6 and sign an Owner Consent Form prior to the first administration.” (Source: Pfizer)

We were never shown a fact sheet on the drug, never “advised of the risks”, and certainly not given an Owner Consent Form” by our vet to sign. (In hindsight, we feel that we should have asked more questions about the drug, but we trusted our veterinarian.) If the side effects had been presented to us as they have in our research, we would NOT have consented to have Pro Heart 6 administered to our dogs.

We also found some literature suggesting that ProHeart 6 should not be administered at the same time as vaccinations: “Allergic reactions, sometimes serious, have been reported when ProHeart 6 and vaccinations have been given at the same time. Talk to your veterinarian about the risks of administering ProHeart 6 at the same time as vaccinations.” (Source link here.) Our vet administered ProHeart 6 at the same time as Jack rabies vaccine, and distemper/bordetella.

The drug’s information page from Drugs.com states the following: “Owners should be advised of the potential for adverse reactions, including anaphylaxis, and be informed of the clinical signs associated with drug toxicity. Owners should be advised to contact their veterinarian immediately if signs of toxicity are observed. The vast majority of patients with drug related adverse reactions have recovered when the signs are recognized and veterinary care, if appropriate, is initiated.” (Source: Drugs.com)

When we did recognize that something was going on with our dog, we did what we thought good pet owners are supposed to do. We took him back to the vet. The vet should have recognized that he was having an adverse reaction to the ProHeart6 that she administered to him  (without our “informed” consent) only weeks earlier and treated him appropriately. If the vetrinarian had recognized his symptoms, he could have recovered. She did not, and as a result, our otherwise healthy dog died. Now, we are left waiting on the drug to work its way out of our remaining dog’s system praying that she does not fall victim to the same fate.

Stories of dogs that died as a result of being administered this drug are abundant. Check out any of the following links for more information, and please, ask for all of the facts, side effects, and more information when your vet (or doctor) recommends this drug (or any drug). ProHeart 6 provides no additional benefits or protection than safer, oral heartworm preventatives.

Additional Resources:

Letters & Data by the Drug Manufacturer from the FDA’s Website:

July 22, 2002 “Dear Doctor” Letter warning of additional “adverse reactions”

June 19, 2003 “Dear Doctor” Letter advising of label changes due to “adverse reactions”

“Risk Minimization Action Plan” for the Re-Introduction of ProHeart 6 to the Market (63 Pages which includes the newest precautions, and the actual drug label, “Client Information Sheet”, and “Owner Consent Form”—none of which we were ever given.)

May 30 UPDATE: I truly appreciate all of your condolences and support, and all of you who have shared this blog on your social media sites. It makes me feel much better knowing that we are raising consumer consciousness.

We aren’t trying to tell you what to do with your pets, just encouraging you to gather information before making any decisions.

A vet that works for Pfizer, the drug manufacturer, contacted us today to ask us if we would let them do an autopsy necropsy on Jack. (They had already called the crematorium to make sure his body had not been cremated yet.) We agreed. In fact, we felt relieved and feel that we will get some answers soon. His body is now on the way to the University of Florida to be examined by experts.

Our other dog does not seem to be exhibiting the same symptoms (so far thank goodness).

May 31 UPDATE: Pfizer called back today to let us know they were planning on reimbursing us for the money we paid to have Jack cremated.

His body is being sent to a different lab in Florida and it will be 4-6 weeks before we get a full autopsy necropsy report. They are doing tissue samples, toxicology… The whole nine yards.

Pfizer seems as interested in getting answers as we do. Which is more than we can say for our (former) vet.

The vet has not responded to our requests for answers. (I.e. Did the vet who administered the shot complete Pfizer’s mandatory training? Why were we not given the “Owner Consent Form” and drug fact sheet? Why did the vet not recognize Jack’s symptoms when we took him back in?)

I have received lots of emails and messages from others who have lost their pets. My heart goes out to you. Some have asked me to publicly name the vet. I’m not going to do that (yet). I may, or may not, do that when we receive the autopsy results. At that time, we will know who is truly culpable. In the meantime, just be sure to ask your vet (or doctor for that matter) for lots of information before consenting to anything.

 

Thank you to Ashley for sharing your story.  We hope that by reaching as many dog lovers as possible, additional tragedies can be avoided.

Written by Dr. Patty Khuly, contributor to VetMD and the blog Fully Vetted. Reprinted with permission.

FEB 07, 2011

I’ve written about the dog-toxicity of the popular sugar substitute xylitol so often and so fervently that a Google search for “xylitol and dogs” digs up my past posts on the subject among the first several findings. And that’s cool. But it’s not nearly enough. Indeed, the fact that I’m up there tells me precious few people are getting the news. Which is why I keep trying …

Yes, xylitol is still killing dogs … more dogs than ever before. This, despite my efforts and those of like-minded big mouths who seek to inform all U.S. consumers that xylitol is a menace to dogdom.

How menacing? A few sugar-free breath fresheners, a pack of gum, a spilled tin of mints, a sugar-free dessert cup. It takes only a little of this toxin to send a dog into hypoglycemia-induced seizures, and just a little bit more to bring on liver failure.

And what’s worse is not so much its extreme toxicity … but its insidiousness.

Let me explain:

Xylitol is a great product. It’s a natural extract from the birch tree, and it takes only a little bit of this stuff to sweeten a whole lot. It’s therefore less expensive than other sugar substitutes. And it happens to taste better than most of them. Diabetics everywhere can rejoice! The tooth fairy, too.

All of which is why consumer product manufacturers have been slowly and quietly replacing other sweeteners with xylitol … in everything, not just products that are labeled sugar-free.

And that’s the trouble. When I first started writing about xylitol three or four years ago the number of consumer products containing xylitol numbered less than a hundred in the U.S. Moreover, they were largely restricted to the arena of sugar-free gums and foods. Fast-forward to today and the list is way longer and much more diverse. You can find xylitol in everything from Flintstones vitamins to commonly prescribed drugs.

These latter products pose more of a problem for dog owners and veterinarians for a variety of reasons.

These products never used to contain xylitol. In fact, I used to recommend Flintstones vitamins for my patients. Now I have to caution my clients to stick to pet-only brands and to be very diligent about reading labels. But it took months before I became aware of the change in this brand’s ingredients. (So you know, xylitol is included in only a few of the Flintstones formulations, not all.)

What’s worse — and even more stressful for veterinarians — is that it’s not just common consumer products anymore that we have to watch for. The human versions of drugs, especially the children’s elixirs, are now being formulated with xylitol for greater pediatric palatability. Unfortunately, the lower doses in the kids’ meds are exactly what some of our smaller animal patients require.

Got a little dog who needs hycodan syrup for a cough, or the bronchodilator theophylline for breathing? Even if you’ve been getting a drug for months or years as an elixir from the same exact pharmacy, beware. Preparations of these drugs may soon change to reflect the widening market for xylitol as a sweetener.

Case in point: This week I sought to relieve a clients’ small dog of back pain associated with recurrent episodes of intervertebral disc disease. In so doing, I prescribed a dog-only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and the smallest dosage of gabapentin (used for both seizures and neurogenic pain) currently formulated. But the pharmacy had run out of the 100 mg capsules, which is why I received a call from the pharmacist to see if I would OK the liquid (elixir) version instead.

Now, I’d like to say I’m always up on every single drug and all the new formulations, but I’m not. It’s just too damn much info to consume on a regular basis. I had, however, just read through Plumb’s Veterinary Drug Handbook on this exact point: available formulations of gabapentin. And guess what? Some commercially prepared versions of liquid gabapentin have xylitol in them — and it was one of these very versions my pharmacist was offering.

The same drug I was offering my patient might have killed her had I not known about the change!

Now, I don’t know how much of the elixir it would’ve taken to send her into seizures, but rest assured, this little dog was already getting the high end of the drug’s dose, so I think I’m justified in fearing the worst for other dogs all over the country whose pharmacists don’t make the call (it happens all the time), or whose veterinarians haven’t yet heard of the dangers pediatric elixirs now pose to animals.

Does this shock you?

It should. It terrifies me.

Dr. Patty Khuly

Next: Did you know? 10 things toxic to dogs.

Back to: Sheltie FAQ

It is one of the most joyous and festive times of the year, but  winter months can create special dangers for all our pets.   Here are a few tips to help keep your “furry children”  safe during this special time of year.

Holiday Items

  • Tinsel/Ribbon – can be ingested and cause serious gastrointestinal trauma.
  • Christmas tree water (with additives) – can cause stomach upset.
  • Bubble lights – contain methylene chloride which can be harmful if swallowed as a liquid or inhaled as a vapor.
  • Lights/electrical cords – cats, kittens & puppies may bite cords causing electrocution.
  • Glass/Plastic ornaments – can cause serious gastrointestinal trauma.

Winter Items

  • Antifreeze – even a small amount (1 tablespoon) can be fatal to a small pet.
  • Rodenticide – should not be used in a home with pets or small children.
  • Ice Melts – can cause ulceration if left on the skin or feet.  Can also cause serious gastrointestinal trauma if ingested.

Food Items

  • Alcohol – can be toxic to pets causing breathing problems & depression.
  • Chocolate – dark and/or bakers chocolate is more harmful in smaller doses than milk chocolate.  All chocolate should be kept away from pets.
  • Human Food – is too rich for pets, and while it’s tempting to share over the holidays, it’s best to keep your pet on his/her normal diet.
  • Macadamia Nuts – cause difficulty walking, tremors & swollen limbs.
  • Yeast dough – if enough is ingested before it has risen fully or cooked, it will continue to rise causing serious gastrointestinal distress.

Plants

  • Holly Berries – can cause gastrointestinal upset if ingested in large quantities.
  • Mistletoe – can be very toxic to pets if ingested.
  • Pointsettias – are not as toxic as once believed, but can cause stomach upset.
  • Lillies – even in small amounts, can cause serious kidney damage if ingested.
  • Yew – causes muscle tremors, difficulty walking & has adverse cardiac effects.
  • Cyclamen – the roots of this plant can cause serious gastrointestinal distress.

If you suspect your pet has been poisoned, you should call your veterinarian or you can call the NAPCC.

(NAPCC stands for National Animal Poison Control Center)
This is not a free call.
* 1-800-548-2423 ($30 per case, credit card only; free follow-up until problem is resolved.)
* 1-900-680-0000 ($20 for 5 minutes, $2.95 per minute thereafter).

Thanks to Lynn for the cute photo of Jason, Kaleigh and Hannah!

Apple That size of a number seems crazy and makes me wonder if posting the list of NON poisonous would be shorter?!

This list can’t possibly begin to cover every single poisonous plant in existence, and it should also be noted that some of these plants are much more toxic than others.  It is important to use your best judgment when determining whether or not these plants should remain in your home or garden.

Consider your personal situation and the normal behavior of your Sheltie.

Alfalfa (multiple exposures)
Aloe Vera
Amarylillis
Apple – The seeds of an apple can be poisonous.
Apple Leaf Croton
Apricot (pit)
Arrowgrasses – These are marsh type plants whose leaves contain poisons.
Asparagus Fern
Atropa Belladonna – This is a type of garden herb in which the entire plant can be poisonous, especially its seeds & roots.
Autumn Crocus – This is a commonly found garden flower in which the entire plant can be poisonous.
Avacado (fruit & pit)
Azalea
Baby’s Breath
Baneberry  – This is a wildflower whose berries & roots are the poisonous portions.
Bird of Paradise – This is a garden flower whose pods are poisonous.
Bittersweet
Black Locust – This is a tree in which the entire plant can be poisonous, especially the bark & shoots.
Bloodroot – Is a wildflower & herb whose stem & roots are most poisonous, however the entire plant is toxic.
Box – Is an ornamental shrub that is poisonous in its entirety, but especially the leaves.
Branching Ivy
Buckeye – This is a tree whose sprouts, nuts & seeds contain poisons.
Buddist Pine
Buttercup – This is a wildflower & garden herb that is poisonous in its entirety but mostly in the leaves.
Caladium – Is a houseplant that is poisonous in its entirety.
Calla Lily
Carolina Jessamine – This is an ornamental plant whose flowers & leaves contain poisons.
Castor Bean
Ceriman
Charming Dieffenbachia
Cherry (seeds & wilting leaves)
Chinaberry Tree – Is a tree whose berries are poisonous.
Cineraria
Chinese Evergreen
Chockcherries – This is a wild shrub whose poisonous parts include the leaves, cherries & pit.
Christmas Rose – Is a garden flower that contains toxic leaves & rootstock.
Clematis
Common Privet – Is an ornamental shrub whose leaves & berries can be poisonous.
Cordatum
Corn Cockle – Is a wildflower & weed whose seeds are particularly poisonous.
Corn Plant
Cornstalk Plant
Cowbane – This is a wildflower & herb that is poisonous in its entirety, especially the roots.
Cow Cockle – Is a wildflower & weed whose seeds are poisonous.
Cowslip – Is a wildflower & herb whose entire plant is poisonous, especially the leaves & stem.
Croton
Cuban Laurel
Cutleaf Philodendron
Cycads
Cyclamen
Daffodil – Is a garden flower whose bulbs are poisonous.
Daphne – This is an ornamental shrub that contains poisonous bark, berries & leaves.
Death Camas – This is a field herb whose poisonous parts include the leaves, stems, seeds & flowers.
Delphinium – Is a wildflower that is poisonous in its entirety, especially the sprouts.
Devil’s Ivy
Dieffenbachia
Dracaena Palm
Dragon Tree
Dumbcane – This is a houseplant & is poisonous in its entirety.
Dutchman’s Breeches – Is a wild & garden flower whose roots & foliage are poisonous.
Elaine
Elderberry – Is a tree whose poisonous parts include the leaves, bark, roots & buds.
Elephant’s Ear – This is a houseplant poisonous in its entirety.
Emerald Feather
English Ivy – Is an ornamental vine that is completely poisonous but especially the leaves & berries.
European Bittersweet – This is a vine poisonous in its entirety but especially in the berries.
False Flax – Is a wild herb whose seeds are poisonous.
False Hellebore – Is an ornamental flower whose roots, leaves & seeds are toxic.
Fan Weed – This is a wildflower & herb whose seeds are poisonous.
Fiddle-leaf fig
Field Peppergrass – Is a wildflower & herb that contains poisonous seeds.
Flax – Is a wildflower & herb whose seedpods contain poisons.
Florida Beauty
Foxglove – This is a wild & garden flower whose leaves are poisonous.
Fruit Salad Plant
Geranium
German Ivy
Giant Dumb Cane
Glacier Ivy
Gold Dieffenbachia
Gold Dust Dracaena
Golden Pothos
Hahn’s Self-Branching Ivy
Heartland Philodendron
Holly – Is a shrub containing poisonous berries.
Horsechestnut – Is a tree containing poisonous nuts & sprouts.
Horse Nettle – Is a wildflower & herb poisonous in its entirety, especially the berries.
Hurricane Plant
Hyacinth – This is a wild & houseplant whose bulbs are poisonous.
Indian Rubber Plant
Iris – Is a wild & garden flower whose leaves & roots are poisonous.
Jack-in-the-Pulpit – Is a wildflower that is entirely poisonous, especially the leaves & roots.
Janet Craig Dracaena
Jatropha – This is a tree & shrub whose seeds are poisonous.
Jerusalem Cherry – Is an ornamental plant whose un-ripened fruit & foliage are poisonous.
Jimsonweed – Is a field plant that is entirely poisonous, especially the seeds.
Kalanchoe
Laburum – Is an ornamental plant whose seeds, pods & flowers can be poisonous.
Lacy Tree Philodendron
Lantana – Is a houseplant whose foliage is poisonous.
Larkspur – Is a wildflower that is poisonous only as a young plant.
Laurels – This is a type of shrub with poisonous leaves.
Lily of the Valley
Lupines – Is a shrub whose seeds & pods are poisonous.
Madagascar Dragon Tree
Manchineel Tree – A tree containing poisonous sap & fruit.
Marble Queen
Marijuana
Matrimony Vine – An ornamental vine containing poisonous leaves & shoots.
Mayapple – A wildflower poisonous in the form of its un-ripened fruit as well as the foliage & roots.
Mexican Breadfruit
Milk Vetch – A wildflower poisonous in its entirety.
Miniature Croton
Mistletoe – A houseplant with poisonous berries.
Monkshood – A wildflower poisonous in its entirety, especially the roots & seeds.
Moodseed – A vine whose fruit & roots are poisonous.
Morning Glory – Is a wildflower containing poisonous seeds & roots.
Mother-in Law’s Tongue
Mountain Mahogany – Is a shrub with poisonous leaves.
Mustards – These are wildflowers whose seeds can be poisonous.
Narcissus – This is a garden flower whose bulbs contain poisons.
Needlepoint Ivy
Nephytis
Nicotiana – Is a garden flower whose leaves are poisonous.
Nightshade – Is a wildflower & vine with poisonous leaves & berries.
Oaks – Are trees with poisonous leaves & shoots.
Oleander
Onion
Peace Lily
Peach (wilting leaves & pits)
Pencil Cactus
Philodendrons – Are houseplants poisonous in their entirety.
Plumosa Fern
Poison Ivy
Poison Oak
Pokeweed – Is a field plant containing poisonous roots, seeds & berries.
Poinsettia – Is a houseplant with poisonous leaves, flowers & stems.
Poison Hemlock – This is a field plant containing poisonous leaves, stems & fruit.
Potato – A garden plant whose shoots & sprouts can be poisonous.
Pothos
Potato Plant (green fruit, stem & leaves)
Precatory Bean
Primrose
Rattle Box – Is a wildflower that is entirely poisonous.
Red Emerald
Red Princess
Red-Margined Dracaena
Rhododendron – Is an ornamental shrub whose leaves are poisonous.
Rhubarb – A garden plant with poisonous leaves.
Ribbon Plant
Rosary Pea – Is a houseplant whose seeds are poisonous.
Saddle Leaf Philodendron
Sago Palm
Satin Pothos
Schefflera
Silver Pothos
Skunk Cabbage – A marsh plant whose entire plant is poisonous but especially the roots & leaves.
Smart Weeds – Are wildflowers c
ontaining poisonous sap.
Snow-on-the-Mountain – This is a wildflower whose sap is poisonous.
Sorghum – Is a type of grass whose leaves are poisonous.
Spotted Dumb Cane
Star of Bethlehem – Is a wildflower poisonous in its entirety.
String of Pearls
Striped Dracaena
Sweetheart Ivy
Swiss Cheese Plant
Taro Vine
Tomato Plant (green fruit, stem & leaves)
Tree Philodendron
Tropic Snow Dieffenbachia
Velvet Grass – A variety of grass whose leaves are poisonous.
Weeping Fig
Wild Black Cherry – Is a tree with poisonous leaves & pits.
Wild Radish – A wildflower with poisonous seeds.
Wisteria – Is an ornamental plant containing poisonous seeds & pods.
Woody Aster – A wildflower whose entire plant is poisonous.
Yellow Jessamine – An ornamental vine that is entirely poisonous.
Yellow Pine Flax – A wildflower poisonous in its entirety but especially in the seedpods.
Yew

Thanks to Sheltieboy for the pic of Patrick enjoying his Christmas treat!

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