Pip’s death is a reminder to beware of coyotes

By DAVID BORAKS
CorneliusNews.net/DavidsonNews.net

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Pip died after two attacks in his yard in Davidson, NC.

Coyotes are more prevalent than ever in Lake Norman, NC neighborhoods these days, and they’re presenting a new danger for our pets. Two coyotes fatally attacked a dog in his Davidson yard last week, and his owners say it’s a reminder that pet owners need to beware.

Bruce and Lynn Henderson of Lynbrook Drive, off Concord Road, lost their 10-year-old Sheltie named Pip last week after he was attacked for the second time in two weeks.

The dog’s injuries from the Jan. 7 and Jan. 16 attacks were so serious he had to be euthanized.

“I hope our neighbors learn from our painful lesson: Keep a close eye on small dogs and cats, which coyotes target as easy prey,” Bruce Henderson said Tuesday. “Make sure rabies vaccinations are up to date (coyotes are carriers). And don’t assume fences will keep them out — we think our coyotes wriggled under the wire, and they easily scaled its 4-foot height.”

Experts say humans are the coyote’s only real threat in North Carolina right now, leaving most other small animals and pets as prey for the 20- to 40-pound animals. They’ve been seen with increasing frequency on greenways and trails and in neighborhoods.

In 2011, Cornelius police issued a telephone alert after a woman walking her dog spotted a coyote on the McDowell Creek Greenway, off Westmoreland Road.

Residents in other neighborhoods in the Lake Norman area also have reported seeing or hearing coyotes in recent years. The problem of urban coyotes came up at the Mecklenburg County Commission in February 2012, after fatal attacks on dogs were reported in east Charlotte and other neighborhoods.

Mecklenburg County Parks & Recreation set up a coyote page on its website, offering information and asking residents to report sitings.

Bruce Henderson, the environmental reporter for The Charlotte Observer and a longtime member of the Davidson Lands Conservancy, said this month’s attacks were the first time he has seen coyotes so close to homes in Davidson.

“We see deer routinely in our yard, and we’ve seen foxes, groundhogs, skunks, raccoons, barred owls and other types of urban wildlife that in retrospect are probably coyote prey,” he said. “But we’d seen no suggestion that coyotes were in the area.”

Pip, a 25-pound Shetland sheepdog, was inside a 4-foot fence in the Hendersons’ back yard during the first attack on Jan. 7. A neighborhood boy saw the attack from the street around 5 or 5:30pm. One coyote attacked the dog in the backyard, while another coyote was outside the fence.

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The Hendersons’ two, larger Australian shepherds ran out out of the house as Pip scooted inside through a dog door. The coyote jumped the fence and fled. (Experts say coyotes can leap a 6-foot fence.)

A passing Fed Ex delivery driver flashed his headlights and honked his horn to help scare off the coyotes, Bruce Henderson said.

After examining Pip’s injuries, veterinarians told them they believe both coyotes had attacked at once, biting him all over his body, including to all four legs.

Henderson said Pip seemed to be on the mend until Jan. 16, when he got out of the house and into the backyard again. Lynn Henderson came home to find him bloody again.

“The vet told us those bites were superficial. We think the Aussies chased off the attacker. But the vet found that Pip’s skin had been basically ripped off the muscle over most of his body during the initial attack — the coyotes apparently shook him like a rug, one on either end,” Bruce Henderson said.

That led to an infection, and the dog’s skin was dying. A long and uncertain recovery seemed likely. “We couldn’t let him suffer through that, so put him down,” Bruce said.

by Samantha Williams

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Annah is reunited with her delighted owner.

A much-loved pet dog that went missing has been found safe and well in Ashford – 500 miles from home in Scotland.

Annah, a seven-year-old Shetland sheepdog, was reported lost by her owner Leanda Scott-Loosemore in May after disappearing from Cupar, in Fife.

Despite alerting the police and posting an appeal on Facebook, Mrs Loosemore was shocked to received a call from Ashford Borough Council to say Annah had been discovered wandering the streets here.

Officials were able to trace Annah’s owners after scanning her microchip.

Although it is not known how Annah ended up in Ashford, the pet is now happy at home again after being reunited with her family in Scotland just in time for Christmas.

Mrs Scott-Loosemore – who is mother to Jayden, four, and three-year-old Chantelle – said: “We had given up hope of ever getting her home. When we got her back up to Fife it was a very, very happy time!

“My kids were so excited to see her, as was she to see them.”

Ashford council spokesman Mark James said: “We were delighted to be able to reunite Anna with her owner.”

He said Annah had been found at Ducks Farm in Smarden.

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Shetland sheepdog Annah was found wandering around Ashford.

Mr James added: “Apparently a builder on site saw the dog running around in a nearby field and managed to catch it and report it to the council.

“We have a microchip reader and so always scan dogs when we pick them up as strays so that we can see if it is possible to trace the owner as soon as we can.

“We read the chip and then phoned the company that administer the microchips and they tally the number up with the contact details they have and that’s when we were made aware the dog had been stolen and from there made steps to reunite Annah with her owner.”

Mr James said the incident emphasized the importance of having a dog micro-chipped.

He added: “We are pleased that there was a happy outcome to this story and that Annah is now safe and enjoying home comforts once again.”

Charles Ledford, University of Illinois Published: Nov 19, 2013, 4:10 PM EST weather.com

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Jon Byler Dann, above, survived the devastating tornado that struck Washington, Ill., by hunkering down in the basement clutching his four children – ages 8, 5, 2½ and 1½. But an important member of the family was still in harm’s way. Before the storm, as debris started to hit his house, Byler Dann had tried to coax the family dog, Maggie, into the safe room. The skittish animal refused to leave her kennel. After the storm passed, Byler Dann emerged from the basement to find that his home of five years had been destroyed above him. Maggie was missing and Byler Dann assumed his beloved pet was dead.

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Nearly 30 hours later, while searching through all that was left of 1322 Coventry Drive, family friends heard a faint bark coming from beneath where they were standing.

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They immediately started digging and discovered Maggie buried beneath the rubble, wrapped in a piece of carpeting.

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 Byler Dann burst into tears. Maggie was shivering, filthy and in obvious pain. But she was alive.

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After giving her water, Byler Dann posted her photo to his Facebook page while friends arranged to drive her to a local veterinarian’s office – Teegarden Veterinary Clinic.

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Maggie is being treated for a dislocated hip, but is expected to be okay. Byler Dann, 37, has had the 11-year-old dog since she was 4 months old.

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“I felt intense relief and elation but also just panic,” Byler Dann says of finding Maggie injured. “I’m very thankful and blessed to have my wife and my children. And finding my dog today was just unreal.”

Weather.com Assistant Editor Allie Goolrick contributed to this report.

Update – The clinic reports: “Maggie is doing good considering everything she has been through. We expect a good prognosis with her. We’re taking donations by calling the clinic (309-444-2311) or mailing to 2323 Eureka Rd., Washington, IL 61571. Maggie’s current needs have been met, but further contributions will go towards other pets that we have been treating here at the clinic as a result of the tornado.”

By Michael Walsh / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

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Animal lover Paul Kemp of Des Moines, Iowa, amazed his co-workers at no-kill shelter Animal Lifeline Thrift Shop with the tale of Sheeba’s heroism.

Man’s best friend earned that moniker — yet again — when one saved her owner’s life by waking him during a house fire Tuesday morning. That man wasted no time returning the favor.

Paul Kemp lost everything in the fire that ravaged his Des Moines, Iowa, home, and he would have died if his Shetland Sheepdog, Sheeba, 3, hadn’t jumped on his chest, reported KCCI .

“Her first instinct was to wake me up, you know, thinking about me first,” Kemp told the local station.

The Iowa man awoke to see the fire raging a mere 10 feet away and used his coffeepot to throw water on the flames, but when that didn’t help, he bolted from the home.

Kemp thought the Sheltie was hot on his tail but realized she was still in the burning building once he got outside. He rushed back inside and yelled for Sheeba, who came running toward him. Both emerged from the flaming home unscathed.

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Sheeba is Kemp’s ‘life, his pride and joy,’ said a co-worker.

“I love her. She’s my little girl, you know,” Kemp said. “I’ve always loved her, but, you know, now that she, you know, she saved my life, you know, she showed me that she’s my best friend, you know, because, she was worried about me.”

Kemp went to his job at the Animal Lifeline Thrift Shop, a no-kill shelter for abused animals, where he has worked for about six months and amazed his co-workers with the story.

“He has the best spirits about it, and he just loves that dog,” assistant manager Amy Jones told The News. “He’s so thankful for what happened and what he’s got. That dog is his life, his pride and joy.”

The man and his best friend are staying at a nearby motel until he finds a new apartment. He has homeowners’ insurance.

tobyhappy2I still do not have an answer from the developers of the new email delivery software as to why the importation of existing emails is not working. However, we did get the new sign up process to stop sending duplicate emails. So if you miss your daily Sheltie Nation email, all you have to do is type in your email into the box on the upper right hand side of the page that says “SN Daily Email”.  Be sure to check your email spam folder for the confirmation email that will be sent and follow the instructions from there. That should do it!

Thank you everyone for your patience as I worked though this and enjoy this super cute picture of a happy Toby! :)

alfieSo I thought I was going to be slick and improve the daily email delivery of the Sheltie Nation posts without you all noticing.  It should have been a simple importation of everyone’s email addresses. Wrong!  Apparently importing made a big mess of things and everyone was getting multiple deliveries of the same email. (Google is doing away with the Feedburner application that we have been using for many years and I’ve been putting off the transfer for some time.)

I apologize for bombarding your email. The designer of the software has not gotten back to me with a fix yet, so I don’t have a work around yet.

Thanks for your patience everyone! (And a thanks to Bebe for the cute picture of Alfie!)

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Stella the Shetland Sheepdog, stands next to Jeannine Michalec at PAWS. Stella has been missing since a wreck on the Eglin reservation killed one of her owners more than a year ago

FORT WALTON BEACH — A dog missing since a wreck on the Eglin reservation killed her owner more than a year ago has been reunited with her family.

When Jonathan Seaton’s Jeep overturned while he was trail riding Jan. 21, 2012, his fiancée, Jeannine Michalec, was thrown free.

She remembers waking up and seeing their puppy, a sheltie named Stella, running into the woods. She got up to help Jon and never saw the dog again.

“Jon had told me that we shouldn’t take her with us,” she said. “I felt we didn’t spend enough time with her. I insisted we take her.”

Family, friends, law officers and animal control workers searched for the young sheltie for weeks afterward.

Late last week, she was dropped off at the Panhandle Animal Welfare Society by someone who found her wandering in Ocean City. Michalec had since moved to Pensacola but drove over for the reunion.

“It’s absolutely surreal,” she said of seeing Stella again. “I’m in shock.”

Her daughter was a toddler when Jon was killed and Stella was lost. She would cry for Stella whenever she heard a dog bark, her mom recalls.

The two were reunited Friday night.

Stella is underweight, has fleas and has tested positive for heartworm, PAWS workers told Michalec. Scrub-A-Pup in Mary Esther gave her a free bath and grooming on Friday.

PAWS workers gave Michalec a big bag of puppy chow and told her to get some weight back on Stella to prepare her for heartworm treatment.

“I’m glad I have her back so I can nurse her back to health,” Michalec said. “She is the only thing that experienced the car accident with me. It’s sort of like a merger with the new life that I’ve created after (Jon’s) death and the previous life.

“It’s really strange.”

Five teenagers were enjoying the tail end of their first adult-free canoe trip on Sunday when they found a startling note inscribed on a rock near the shore of a small island in Cook County, Minn. “Lost dog. Call DNR. Red Sheltie,” the charcoal-written plea read.

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The five teenagers pose with the dog they rescued, Tomah (from left to right): Nate Janssen, Riley Nelson, Jonathan Croskey, Scott Kvidera and Casey Halbmaier.

At first the friends, all current or former cross-country captains at Minnetonka High School, assumed the dog was long gone or had already been found. But the next morning, as they checked out Brule Lake island, they found themselves on an animal rescue mission.

“We were exploring the island and saw the dog, but of course it ran away,” Jonathan Croskey, 17, told TODAY.com. “We looked for about a half-hour.”

They returned to their campsite, but decided not to give up on trying to find the dog. The Shetland sheepdog returned to their area two more times that afternoon, and each time the runners darted after her, only to be thwarted by her skillful navigation through the dense forest. Their search continued for a few hours that night without success, though they were woken up several times by the dog’s bark in the background.

“But when we came out of our tents, it kept running away,” Croskey said. “We just couldn’t get to it.”

By the next morning, the dog’s skittish demeanor had changed. They found her lying still on the edge of their camp, where they quickly tied a makeshift harness around her body so she couldn’t wander away again.

“It wasn’t running or anything, so we slowly moved in to get a hold of it,” Croskey said of the dog. “We canoed back to meet my dad, and she was calm, but she seemed pretty scared at the same time.”Croskey’s father, Tom, met the boys at their designated pickup point, and was surprised to find the group had gained a sixth member. “We were just pleased as can be,” Tom said. “This was the first time they were out on their own.”

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The original notice.

Meanwhile, 18-year-old Ashley Ross was mourning the loss of her 6-year-old pup, Tomah, who ran off around dinnertime on July 20, during a family camping trip to the Brule Lake island. The family had searched the island unsuccessfully for two days, and notified the Forest Service of their missing Sheltie on their way home.

“We figured she’d find her way back on that cold Saturday night, but when she didn’t, everyone got a little more worried,” Ross told TODAY.com. “When we had to leave the island, we weren’t sure what was going to happen.”

Ashley Ross’s father, Mike, had brought home the dog in 2007 when his stateside deployment in Wisconsin was over. She named the dog Tomah for the city her dad was stationed in during his military service.

It was her father who got the call from the Forest Service on Tuesday afternoon, and went to pick up Tomah, though he didn’t immediately tell his daughter about the rescue. Instead, he stopped by the Lutsen Mountains, where she was working, and gave her quite the surprise.

“At first I was sad because when my dad shows up to work or school, it’s usually bad news. I figured they were going to say they didn’t find her or she wasn’t alive,” Ross said. “I was already crying by that point.”

But her tears of sadness turned into joy when her father stepped aside, revealing her lost friend.

“It was so exciting,” Ashley said. “I was most definitely surprised and very grateful.”

They took the very tired Tomah home, where the dog got some much-needed rest and returned to her normal self within a couple of days.

“Our family is very thankful,” Ross said. “We’re very lucky to have had people find her.”

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Forest Service officials helped Tomah find his way back to Ashley Ross by alerting her father, Mike. Tomah also wandered away when she was just a puppy.